A Special Spirit Now Flies Free

At the grand age of 31, our ambassador Red-tailed Hawk, Lady Hawk, passed quickly and peacefully on Saturday. As a young non-releasable bird, her charisma led to the addition of education as a mission at Tamarack. Over these 31 years she has educated and inspired over 100,000 members of the public. An astounding achievement for her and for Tamarack. Seven other raptors and two reptiles now assist us as ambassadors.
Lady Hawk enjoyed good health until the very end. With the average hawk's lifespan 7-15 years in the wild, care in captivity can extend this, with some living to 30+ years, comparable to a 100 year old human.
Lady Hawk will also be remembered by each of Tamarack's past and present volunteers. The largest ambassador raptor at Tamarack, when volunteers earned the privilege of stepping her onto their glove, it was an unforgettable experience.
Her life is a bridge between Tamarack's past, present and future as her legacy continues. Each day as we educate and inspire the public to care about wildlife and the environment, her mission continues. Last year, when Tamarack established a giving society for those seeking to include TWC in their planned giving, the name "Lady Hawk Legacy Society" was chosen.
We welcome those who knew and loved her to share memories on our memorial website https://everloved.com/life-of/lady-hawk/. Gifts in her honor are welcome and can be made via the website or mailed. She will be honored at our Open House, which will be held September 25 this year.

 

 

Bird Flu Outbreak

As you may have heard, a new severe form of bird flu known as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI)virus, subtype H5N1, is causing illness in both domestic and wild birds. It is hoped this will subside with warmer weather. First detected in North America in December, it has spread throughout the US, resulting in the loss of 35 million domestic poultry, as well as numerous wild birds. In our region, HPAI has been confirmed in Bald Eagles and wild ducks, but has not been as impactful as other areas of the country.

This flu variant can be carried and spread by waterfowl, shore birds, gulls, and crows that show no symptoms. It is highly fatal to poultry, raptors, and some other wild bird species. Biologists are concerned it could become transmissible to humans, but this has not been an issue thus far. TWC has been collaborating with the PA Game Commission and professionals at other rehab centers and zoos to monitor the incidence of HPAI, protect TWC’s beloved education birds, and keep our staff, volunteers, and the public safe.

Due to concerns about the virus, please do not arrive unannounced at the center with a wild bird! We are still treating birds, but they are being admitted at an offsite location for evaluation and testing prior to moving to the center for treatment. Our phone helpline volunteers will give you instructions for admission.

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